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Je n’ai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits

Je n’ai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits, 1969 by Joan Miro is an original Etching and Aquatint in colors. This print is from the illustrated book “Je nai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits” by Louis Aragon. From the signed and numbered edition of 175. Comes with original book. The edition consists of 175, numbered 1 to 175, and 25 not for sale prints numbered I to XXV, reserved for friends and collaborators of the book. Text by Louis Aragon. Published by Skira, Geneva. Printing of the engraving: Arte Adrien Maeght, Paris. Dupin 1316.

Miró balanced the kind of spontaneity and automatism encouraged by the Surrealists with meticulous planning and rendering to achieve finished works that, because of their precision, seemed plausibly representational despite their considerable level of abstraction.  Miró often worked with a limited palette, yet the colors he used were bold and expressive. His chromatic explorations, which emphasized the potential of fields of unblended color to respond to one another, provided inspiration for a generation of Color Field painters.

 

Title

Je n’ai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits

Alt. Title

I Never Learned How To Read

Medium

Aquatint, Etching

Year

1969

Edition

175

Catalogue Raisonné

Dupin 1316

Signature

Signed, numbered

Size 9 x 11.5 (in)
23 x 29 (cm)
Price Price on Request
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Description

Je n’ai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits, 1969 by Joan Miro is an original Etching and Aquatint in colors. This print is from the illustrated book “Je nai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits” by Louis Aragon. From the signed and numbered edition of 175. Comes with original book. The edition consists of 175, numbered 1 to 175, and 25 not for sale prints numbered I to XXV, reserved for friends and collaborators of the book. Text by Louis Aragon. Published by Skira, Geneva. Printing of the engraving: Arte Adrien Maeght, Paris. Dupin 1316.

Miró balanced the kind of spontaneity and automatism encouraged by the Surrealists with meticulous planning and rendering to achieve finished works that, because of their precision, seemed plausibly representational despite their considerable level of abstraction.  Miró often worked with a limited palette, yet the colors he used were bold and expressive. His chromatic explorations, which emphasized the potential of fields of unblended color to respond to one another, provided inspiration for a generation of Color Field painters.
Early in his career, Miró primarily painted still-lifes, landscapes, and genre scenes. Influences ranging from the folk art and Romanesque church frescoes of his native Catalan region in Spain to 17th-century Dutch realism were eventually superseded by more contemporary ones: Fauvism, Cubism, and Surrealism captivated the young artist, who had relocated to Paris in 1921. His exposure to the ideas of André Breton and Breton’s Surrealist circle prompted Miró to make radical changes to his style, although the artist cannot be said to have identified consistently with a single school. Rather, his artistic career may be characterized as one of persistent experimentation and a lifelong flirtation with non-objectivity. Miró’s signature biomorphic forms, geometric shapes, and semi-abstracted objects are expressed in multiple media, from ceramics and engravings to large bronze installations.

Additional information

Title

Je n’ai jamais appris a lire ou Les Incipits

Alt. Title

I Never Learned How To Read

Medium

Aquatint, Etching

Year

1969

Edition

175

Catalogue Raisonné

Dupin 1316

Signature

Signed, numbered

Size 9 x 11.5 (in)
23 x 29 (cm)
Price Price on Request