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Louise Bourgeois – Crochet IV

Louise Bourgeois, Crochet IV is an original Mixograph in colors. From the Crochet Series printed in 1997. From the signed and numbered edition of 50.

Although she is best known for her large-scale sculpture and installation art, Bourgeois was also a prolific painter and printmaker. She explored a variety of themes over the course of her long career including domesticity and the family, sexuality and the body, as well as death and the subconscious. These themes connect to events from her childhood which she considered to be a therapeutic process. Although Bourgeois exhibited with the Abstract Expressionists and her work has much in common with Surrealism and Feminist art, she was not formally affiliated with a particular artistic movement.

For Bourgeois, abstraction was yet another tool for understanding and coping with her feelings, which were always the driving forces of her art. She used terms like “calming,” “caressing,” or “stabbing” to describe strokes, and her drawn lines and evocative shapes reflect shifting moods and perceived vulnerabilities. Her methods harked back to the automatism of the Surrealists, in which compositions evolved intuitively with symbolic overtones. She often took advantage of repetition, drawing simple straight lines across sheets of notepads as she struggled with insomnia, thereby creating a diary of her fraught emotions.

Title

Crochet IV

Year

1997

Medium

Mixograph

Edition

50

Catalogue Raisonné

NA

Signature

Signed

Size 28 x 33 (in)
71 x 84 (cm)
Price Price on Request
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Description

Louise Bourgeois, Crochet IV is an original Mixograph in colors. From the Crochet Series printed in 1997. From the signed and numbered edition of 50.

Although she is best known for her large-scale sculpture and installation art, Bourgeois was also a prolific painter and printmaker. She explored a variety of themes over the course of her long career including domesticity and the family, sexuality and the body, as well as death and the subconscious. These themes connect to events from her childhood which she considered to be a therapeutic process. Although Bourgeois exhibited with the Abstract Expressionists and her work has much in common with Surrealism and Feminist art, she was not formally affiliated with a particular artistic movement.

For Bourgeois, abstraction was yet another tool for understanding and coping with her feelings, which were always the driving forces of her art. She used terms like “calming,” “caressing,” or “stabbing” to describe strokes, and her drawn lines and evocative shapes reflect shifting moods and perceived vulnerabilities. Her methods harked back to the automatism of the Surrealists, in which compositions evolved intuitively with symbolic overtones. She often took advantage of repetition, drawing simple straight lines across sheets of notepads as she struggled with insomnia, thereby creating a diary of her fraught emotions.

To describe the symbolic resonance spirals held for her, Bourgeois harked back to her childhood, when she watched the workers in her family’s tapestry restoration business wash tapestries in the river and then fiercely wring them out. She segued easily from this recollection to the fantasy of wringing the neck of someone she despised. But in fact, the spiral functioned as a visual metaphor for a range of her emotions, not just anger.

Louise Bourgeois’s work, which spanned most of the 20th century, was heavily influenced by traumatic psychological events from her childhood, particularly her father’s infidelity. Bourgeois’s often brooding and sexually explicit subject matter and her focus on three-dimensional form were rare for women artists at the time. Beginning in the 1970s, she hosted Sunday salons in her Chelsea apartment, where students and young artists would take their work to be critiqued by Bourgeois, who could be ruthless and referred to the gatherings, with characteristically dry humor, as “Sunday, bloody Sunday”. Nevertheless, this accessibility and willingness to advise younger artists was exceptional for an established artist of such standing. Her influence on other artists since the 1970s looms large, but is manifested most strongly in feminist-inspired body art and in the development of installation art.

Louise Bourgeois Crochet IV

Additional information

Title

Crochet IV

Year

1997

Medium

Mixograph

Edition

50

Catalogue Raisonné

NA

Signature

Signed

Size 28 x 33 (in)
71 x 84 (cm)
Price Price on Request