Mini Cart

Jean Cocteau – Calice pour un autel d’eglise

Jean Cocteau, Calice pour un autel d’eglise (Chalice for a Church Altar) is an original drawing in color crayon on paper.  It is signed and dated 1958 by Cocteau.

Jean Cocteau was an enormously influential French artist and writer known as one of the major figures of Dada and Surrealism. With an oeuvre that spanned painting, novels, poetry, plays, and films, Cocteau established himself as a leading creative force in Paris. A regular member of the avant-garde, he maintained long-term friendships with artists such as Pablo Picasso, Tristan Tzara, Francis Picabia, and Man Ray. “The job of the poet (a job which can’t be learned) consists of placing those objects of the visible world which have become invisible due to the glue of habit, in an unusual position which strikes the soul and gives them a tragic force,” he once mused. Born on July 5, 1889 in Maisons-Laffitte, France, the self-taught Cocteau would regularly draw his friends and acquaintances in a distinctive, fluid style informed by his interests in Cubism, psychoanalysis, and Catholicism.

Title

Calice pour un autel d’eglise

Alt. Title

Chalice for a Church Altar

Medium

Drawing in Color Crayon

Year

1958

Edition

Unique

Signature

Signed, dated

Size 10.75 x 8 (in)
27 x 20 (cm)
Price Price on Request
Enquire About This Item
Category:

Description

Jean Cocteau, Calice pour un autel d’eglise (Chalice for a Church Altar) is an original drawing in color crayon on paper.  It is signed and dated 1958 by Cocteau.

Jean Cocteau was an enormously influential French artist and writer known as one of the major figures of Dada and Surrealism. With an oeuvre that spanned painting, novels, poetry, plays, and films, Cocteau established himself as a leading creative force in Paris. A regular member of the avant-garde, he maintained long-term friendships with artists such as Pablo Picasso, Tristan Tzara, Francis Picabia, and Man Ray. “The job of the poet (a job which can’t be learned) consists of placing those objects of the visible world which have become invisible due to the glue of habit, in an unusual position which strikes the soul and gives them a tragic force,” he once mused. Born on July 5, 1889 in Maisons-Laffitte, France, the self-taught Cocteau would regularly draw his friends and acquaintances in a distinctive, fluid style informed by his interests in Cubism, psychoanalysis, and Catholicism.

Additional information

Title

Calice pour un autel d’eglise

Alt. Title

Chalice for a Church Altar

Medium

Drawing in Color Crayon

Year

1958

Edition

Unique

Signature

Signed, dated

Size 10.75 x 8 (in)
27 x 20 (cm)
Price Price on Request